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Huck House Youth Award Winner Jerman D. Price

Jerman first went to the Star House in the summer of 2016 at the age of 20. At that time, due to a lack of support from loved ones and himself, he was homeless and unemployed, and living between a tent and a shelter. Jerman gained employment through the Godman Guild and began making steps […]

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Huck House Youth Award Winner Sara Parker

When Sara first came to Focus Learning Academy in 2015, she had one credit under her belt. She has faced a tremendous amount of adversity throughout her life and she has risen above it all to become a successful student as well as a positive individual. Sara battled abuse, drugs, and a life of crime. […]

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Huck House Youth Award Winner Nikia Glenn-Falls

Nikia suffered a personal tragedy that would bring most of us to our knees. Two years ago, her mother was murdered in front of her. During the days following her mother’s death, Nikia looked to Walnut Ridge High School for support. She questioned how normalcy would ever return to her life. Slowly she began to […]

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Huck House Youth Award Winner Kareena Fox

Kareena left an abusive and violent relationship with the father of her daughter and came to Huck House unsure of what she wanted in life. She was unsure how to be on her own. Over the past year, she has worked tremendously hard on making a better life for herself and her child. She has […]

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Huck House Youth Award Winner Micheal Combs

Micheal is an amazing young man. Mike is being raised by his father and has had many struggles with stable housing. Mike is constantly faced with the challenges of being a young black male in the inner city. When Mike entered Walnut Ridge High School as a freshman, he was unsuccessful academically and was removed […]

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Huck House Youth Award Winner Sharon Bivens

Sharon was removed from her home at a very young age due to physical abuse and spent most of her childhood bouncing between various family members’ homes. Sharon always felt like no one wanted her and did not think there was a point to trying to make any situation work. Feeling unwanted made Sharon angry […]

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Meet the 2017 Huck House Youth Award Winners!

Meet the 2017 Huck House Youth Award Winners! On Tuesday, May 30, we will honor ten amazing young people at the 20th Annual Youth Awards presented by Huck House. On Tuesday, May 3, 2017, the Youth Award Winners and their nominators gathered for a chance to meet and learn about the Huck House Youth Awards […]

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Homeless Youth – Key Statistics

The article below, from Lake News Online, focuses on youth homelessness in Missouri, but contains national statistics worth sharing.

To read the full article go to http://www.lakenewsonline.com/news/20170329/how-we-got-here-why-our-youth-wind-up-homeless


How We Got Here: Why our youth wind up ‘homeless’ 

 

  • “Juveniles are just 24 percent of the total U.S. population, they make up around 34 percent of all people living in poverty.”
  • “In 2013, the poverty rate for single-mother families was 39.6 percent, nearly five times the rate of married-couple families.”
  • “Between 2008 and 2010 [The Great Recession], the number of multiple families living together increased by at least 12 percent.”
  • “Between 20 to 50 percent of homeless women cite intimate partner violence as the primary cause of their homelessness.” (Bassuk et al., 1996; Browne & Bassuk, 1997; Guarino & Bassuk, 2010; Hayes et al., 2013)
  • “According to Child Trends Data Bank’s Homeless Children and Youth Report in 2015, surveys of city officials in the U.S. cited mental illness, substance abuse and lack of affordable housing as the most frequently cited reasons for unaccompanied youth.”

 

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Falling through the Cracks – Youth Homelessness | By: Becky Westerfelt

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We have too many kids falling through cracks that we’ve created. Youth fall fast and hard into poverty on their 18th birthday. Just look at the number of transition age youth in the adult homeless shelter if you want evidence that we are not doing as well as we think. Last year almost 1,000 people in the adult shelter were between the ages of 18-24. In fact, 29% of the families in the adult family shelters were headed by people between the ages of 18-24. While we are rightfully concerned about kids who “age out of foster care”, that group is a fraction of the youth I’m talking about. What is true, however, is that most of those youth spent time in foster care or were served by many of the youth agencies in Franklin County. I know there are many committees and organizations talking about how we as a community should respond. But those of us in the youth-serving part of our human services community are not asking ourselves the hard question, “did we do everything we could when these young people were with us to prepare them to live independently, safely and with hope for their future?”

The three most common comments with which teens greet our Youth Outreach Specialists are: “I need money;” “I don’t have any place to stay;” and “me and my Mom got into it again.” Just in hearing these words from a struggling young adult we recognize that the reality of a “basic need” for a transition-age homeless youth (17-25 years old) is more complicated than the traditional, tangible interpretation of food, shelter and clothing. These young adults are chronologically old enough to transition through the adult shelter system to independent living; but they do not have the life skills, literacy, or requisite intangible adult support to succeed through the process. Making connections to community programs and resources is not enough. These young people are battling numerous, significant social, emotional and mental health barriers that require time and space with adults available to guide and support them.

 

Becky Westerfelt, MSW
Executive Director of the Huckleberry House