PSD nominees

The Paul S. Davis Service Award

PSD nominees

The Paul S. Davis Service Award is given to a Huck House employee who exemplifies the core values of our agency and demonstrates practice distinction. A committee of peers looks for workers whose practice rises well above expectations and reflects Huck House’s commitment to youth and their families. The award was named for Paul Davis, a current Huck House worker who routinely demonstrates best practice. His response to a crisis, his consistency with his clients, and his support of his co-workers were chosen as the standards of Huck House excellence.

The words and phrases used to describe a Paul S. Davis award winner include authenticity, setting a good example, follow through, patience, positive attitude, well rounded, mature, flexible, creative, attention to detail, good boundaries, seeing the big picture, team-oriented, high character, sincere, empathetic, supportive, and in tune with surroundings.

Quarterly award winners are recognized at All Staff meetings. Of the quarterly recipients, one award winner is selected for recognition at the annual Huck House Youth Awards Dinner.

This month, 12 staff members were nominated and recognized at our quarterly all staff meeting. As we hear so often, these individuals go ABOVE AND BEYOND to serve youth. We thought we’d tell you about each of the nominees.

  • Kenosha Hines, Parenting Mentor – “She gives our young people insight to help them understand the bigger picture; she gives them the tools to increase parenting skills.”
  • Amanda Glauer, Manager Transitional Living Program – “She always approaches me in a sincere and supportive manner and offers authentic guidance.”
  • Chinoso Ogojiaku, Crisis Intervention Specialist – “He brings a positive and welcoming vibe to the house. He has quality engagements with the youth. When it comes to conflict resolution, Chinoso approaches the situation calmly and patiently.”
  • Tiffany Hazlett, Transitional Living Apartment Manager – “Her approach with clients to help them thrive is perfect. She helps them to see their gains but pushes them in a way that makes them want to keep pushing.”
  • Andie Ruggles, Family Support Counselor – “Andie is compassionate, a team player, and makes young people feel comfortable. I am thankful that he is flexible and puts our youth first.”
  • Tiffany Ramos, Community Support Assistant – “Tiffany is great at following through and setting good examples for our young people. She always has a smile and a sincere approach to staff and youth.”
  • Erica Schnitz, Family Support Counselor – “Erica communicates effectively with staff and always sees the bigger picture of our young people. She has created good rapport with young people.”
  • Michelle Jordan, Family Support Counselor – “Michelle is so genuine in her approach; she is able to keep her clients engaged in the healing process so they can feel better.”
  • Dalia Gheith, Crisis Intervention Specialist – “Dalia is consistently, infectiously positive. She holds genuine caring conversations with staff and youth about how they are doing. She is an incredible influence in the house.”
  • David Parish, Community Support Assistant – “He consistently provides positive support even with super active toddlers! He sees how this plays a role in the clients’ growth and healing. He brings a sens of calm to the Transitional Living Program.”
  • Donald Gore, Community Support Assistant – “Donald can often be found with a baby in his arms talking to someone about current stressors or progress toward their goals. I admire his compassion and comfortable approach to supporting young people.”
  • Shawmeen Hendersion, administration – “Shawmeen is one of the most patient people at Huck House. She is the definition of “attention to detail.” Much of what she does can easily go unnoticed but I know many of us appreciate her contributions.”

Huck House is an amazing place because of the incredible people who are committed to helping youth get to the lives they picture for themselves.


Happenings in March

Huck House SLEEP OUT
Friday, April 20, 2018 – Saturday April 21, 2018
9:30 pm – 5:30 am
rain or shine, cold or warm
COSI Outdoor Plaza

An overnight event designed to raise awareness and funds for homeless youth in our community

When you commit to SLEEP OUT, you help at-risk young people gain access to safe homes they can sleep in. 
If you have a sleeping bag, then you can help support homeless youth by joining our SLEEP OUT. You’ll spend one night sleeping outside – something too many troubled young people in our communities have to do on too many cold nights. Your goal is to raise money to support Huck House programs that help youth overcome homelessness. Ask your friends and family to support your effort by donating to your SLEEP OUT fundraising effort. We’ll give you all the fundraising tools you need to succeed.

Registration closes April 1. Registration fee of $25 per participant.
Click here to register today!

Get in the Game!

Beginning March 19, Huckleberry House will be participating in the United Way of Central Ohio’s Knock Out Poverty, an online, competitive giving tournament. Huck House will receive 100% of the donations we raise through the tournament. Round One is from Monday, March 19 to Sunday, March 26. If Huck House is one of the top four fundraisers, we will advance to the second round.

On March 19, visit and make a donation to Huckleberry House.

If you are participating in a bracket during March Madness, please consider donating a portion of your bracket group’s pool to Huck House!

2018 Huck House Youth Awards
The Huckleberry House Youth Awards recognize and celebrate youth who have dealt with some of the most difficult problems imaginable. Issues like abuse, violence, neglect, poverty, and homelessness. Community organizations who work with youth across central Ohio are invited to nominate young people. The Youth Awards winners are recognized as outstanding individuals who are moving toward the future they want. Join us for an inspiring night as we honor these incredible young people.

$50 per person
$500 per table of ten
Your kind donation of $300 allows an award winner and his/her guests to attend at no cost.
Tickets may be purchased online, or by check, with “HHYA” in the memo line, mailed to Huckleberry House, 1421 Hamlet Street, Columbus, OH 43201. Questions? Call Huck House at (614) 294-8097.

Triple P comes to TLP

The Positive Parenting Program comes to the Transitional Living Program
About 70% of the young people in Huck House’s Transitional Living Program (TLP) have young children of their own. The Positive Parenting Program (Triple P) is an evidence-based program that provides several levels of intervention to meet families’ needs.

The Ohio Children’s Trust Fund has partnered with Nationwide Children’s Hospital and Syntero, Inc. to provide parent support programming to help decrease parenting stress and improve the well-being of children throughout central Ohio.  Last month, a group of TLP moms participated in a Triple P session.

One of the greatest benefits of participation is the opportunity to talk other moms, learn that everyone has parenting struggles, and find ways to support one another. Other benefits include an improved sense of parental competence, enjoyment of parenting, and improved child behaviors.

“The Triple P parenting class focused on the normalcy of discipline problems in the household,” said Lindsey Buzek, TLP Parenting Mentor. “Parents were able to walk through frustrating situations, as well as hear experts give examples to curb unwanted or disruptive behaviors.”

TLP Parenting mentor Kenosha Hines added that learning effective ways to praise children was also helpful for her TLP clients.

Healthy Eating

Mealtimes as a Single Parent: Easy Tips You Can Start Today

Healthy Eating

Photo By: Pixabay


We might be able to skip naptime or even a bath, but when it comes to meal times, kids are constantly growing, and nutritious food is the fuel they need to do so. However, as a single parent, time is rare, and you might find yourself heading for the drive-thru rather than the kitchen. Eating right is not only an important part of taking care of yourself, but it could be the foundation you need to start making healthier choices. Before you place your order, check out these simple tips to make mealtimes easier and stress-free.

Read more

Infograph homeless 3

Do we Understand Homelessness? | By: Leslie Scott

My attention was recently captured by a PBS New Hour article titled “How Do You Define ‘homeless’ in America”. This is an ongoing question many homeless advocates find themselves asking and trying to answer. Depending on where you work or with what population, the answer often changes. Not just from person to person or agencies, but there is also a lack of homogeneity within state laws, federal laws, and government programs. The United States Federal Government currently has three different definitions for homelessness, each with different criteria and purpose.

McKinney-Vento Act or U.S. Department of Education Definition of Homelessness: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Definition: Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (RHYA) Definition:
Section 725(2) of the McKinney-Vento Act10 defines “homeless children and youths” as individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence… (U.S. Department of Education , 2017).


This definition does not include those in foster care, transitioning out of foster care, or those couch surfing (moving from couch to couch, due to lack of funds for safe/stable housing) (Dr. Hoback & Anderson; U.S. Department of Education , 2017).


This definition is currently used by various US federal programs (U.S. Department of Education , 2017).

HUD operates under categories of homelessness, ranging from Cat 1: Literally homeless, Cat 2: Imminent Risk of Homeless, Cat 3: Homeless Under other Federal Statutes, and Cat 4: Fleeing/Attempting to Flee DV (Homelessness Assistance, n.d.).


This definition is used by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to determine eligibility for programs and to determine which programs would qualify for funding from HUD.

Persons “not more than 21 years of age…for whom it is not possible to live in a safe environment with a relative and who have no other safe alternative living arrangement” (, n.d.).


This definition is currently used for youth serving programs.


Homeless services (including Huckleberry House) have to operate within that system, often resulting in various intake criteria amongst programs within an agency. This prevents not only individuals and families from accessing services, but also may eliminate them from data measurements of the homeless population, reducing the overall awareness and funding projections. This leads many to speculate, if we do not understand homelessness or misrepresent the need of homeless, how can we tackle this issue?

If we were able to operate under one single definition, not only would ALL homeless programs operate under the same funding guidelines, but so would research projects and annual counts which create the yearly data figures for the homeless population. All while creating a standardized understanding of the word “homeless”. Huckleberry House’s belief is that a universal definition of homelessness would make it easier to provide services to the homeless and help to eradicate homelessness.

Infograph homeless 3 Infograph homeless 4

Leslie Scott, LSW CTP-C
Family Support Program Therapist Intern
Candidate, Master of Social Administration, Case Western Reserve University

Depressed teen girl

Runaway Love | Ludacris ft. Mary J. Blige

Runaway Love by Ludacris ft. Mary J. Blige was recorded in 2006, but its message is still relevant today. Abuse, alcohol and drug addiction, violence and teen pregnancy are among the reasons youth runaway or are put out of their home. Youth and families in Huck House programs are dealing with some of the most difficult problems imaginable. No matter how hopeless the situation may seem, we offer proven programs and committed people who know how to help young people and families take control of their lives. So they can move past the circumstances they’re in, and move toward the future they want.

If you or someone you know needs help, call the Huck House 24 hour crisis line at (614) 294-5553 or visit the Crisis Shelter at 1421 Hamlet St. Columbus, Ohio 43201     (614) 294-8097


Jacob’s Story | By: Kyra Crockett-Hodge

Jacob was hanging out at a local library when he came across my business card, which I left a stack of in the foyer. Jacob called the YOP SHOP and told me his story and that he needed help finding housing.  He asked if he could come to the YOP SHOP to meet me to share more of his story.  Jacob is 18 years old, tall and lanky, and when he showed up, his huge, child-like smile greeted me as soon as he walked through the door. We sat down and he continued to tell me how he came to his current circumstances.

Jacob was only 15 when he lost his mother due to cancer. With no next to kin, only smaller siblings in tow, FCCS sent him to West Virginia, where his biological father lived, but with whom he had no relationship with. With the partnership of his grief from losing his beloved mother and anger for his father not being there, his relationship with his dad struggled. Jacob ended up in foster care in West Virginia, where he saved up his money for a Greyhound bus back to Columbus the minute he turned 18. He hoped to return to Ohio to find his younger siblings and a sense of normalcy.

Jacob was determined to defy the odds and enrolled himself in school. At school, he met some friends who told him about an abandoned apartment building in their neighborhood.  This apartment became Jacob’s living arrangement. He spoke of hiding his things in a closet, using materials as a pallet and praying that contractors didn’t come in and find him night to night. To make his situation even worse, one-day Jacob was leaving a friend’s house and was shot in the hip. He was shot just because he was not known in the neighborhood. Because Jacob didn’t have insurance or any adult to seek guidance from, Jacob hobbled around town for a week until we, at Huck House, saw him and made him go to the hospital.

At Huck House, we linked Jacob to services such as counseling to deal with his grief, healthcare, food benefits and bus passes to get to and from appointments, but he never could land on both his feet. I spent many hours with Jacob and worried extensively about what his time unsupervised would bring him. Unfortunately, there were times when Jacob stole from grocery stores to eat and got caught, which resulted in going in and out of court for misdemeanors. With misdemeanors and court, comes fines, more cases and probation, which makes it increasingly difficult to maintain a decent job and any hope for the future.

Jacob has been robbed and beat up several times and because of his transient lifestyle, there were often weeks that I didn’t hear from him, with no phone and no address to consistently locate him at. Upon waiting for his name to come up on the many waitlists for housing that he was on, Jacob met a woman, with whom he had a child and is now trying to figure out how to end the cycle for his son. Jacob has been working full time consistently for about 4 months now and decided to finally go into an adult shelter to seek assistance for his new family. Homelessness is real and the many facets that come along with it are even more real.  Because of their situations, they are subjected to vulnerabilities most wouldn’t know how to handle. As a society, we failed Jacob and must prevent young people from continuing to fall through the cracks.


Written by Kyra Crockett-Hodge, Youth Outreach Program Team Leader


Note: Name has been changed for the sake of privacy.

village detail

“These children are not someone else’s, they belong to all of us.”


In November 2017, Becky Westerfelt, executive director of Huckleberry House, participated in a Columbus Metropolitan Club panel titled “Unexpected Face of Homelessness: Teens on the Street.” We were overwhelmed by the interest from community members to continue the conversation. So we  invited interested people to a casual lunch at the Huck House Crisis Shelter this afternoon.

One of the points Becky made during the panel discussion in November was that we know these children before they turn 18. We see them in our schools and after school programs and at our outreach programs. We should not be surprised to see them in homeless or unstably housed situations when they turn 18. Instead of treating them like they are someone else’s children, central Ohio needs to think of young people as belonging to all of us.

Today’s conversation was based on a framing question:

In our everyday lives, how can we help a child who is not in our immediate family?

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Melanie blog

No One Deserves to be Without a Home | By: Zac and Youth in our Crisis Shelter

“I just wish they would have listened to me.” Young people everywhere deal with a vast amount of daily struggles. Only a handful are able to come forward about some of those struggles, especially if it means leaving home, knowing they have no place to go. Abuse, neglect, misunderstandings and unacceptance are just a few of the things preventing young people from living what we would call a “normal” life at home. Whether it’s just a rebellious attitude or a teen who has “come out” about their sexuality, no one deserves to be without a home. During these times, youth would rather risk their own lives than be put through these trials and tribulations at home.

Support systems are extremely important throughout life especially during times like these. A good support system could prevent so many negative outcomes, it could provide resources, ideas for self-care and most of all… understanding. Outreach is another form of letting the young people know about local resources and support groups. The more we put ourselves out there to these individuals, the more we will see progress in our communities with youth.

This article was written in a group setting by current Crisis Shelter youth, lead by Crisis Staff member Zac.


  • 1 in 7 young people between the ages 10 and 18 will run away
  • Youth ages 12 to 17 are more at risk of homelessness than adults
  • 75% of runaways are females
  • Estimates of the proportion of pregnant homeless girls are between 6% and 22%
  • Between 20% and 40% of runaway and homeless youth identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender or questioning (LGBTQ)
  • 46% of runaway and homeless youth reported being physically abused, 38% reported being emotionally abused, and 17% reported being forced into unwanted sexual activity by a family or household member
  • 75% of homeless or runaway youth have dropped out or will drop out of school

(taken from

Homeless Youth Face Dangerously Cold Temperatures

During the cold month of January, our blog focus is homelessness. Bryant Maddrick, of ABC6, summarizes how Huckleberry House and Star House help homeless teens during this time.