How to Build a Positive Body Image for Your Teen

 

 

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Photo via Pexels

By Daniel Sherwin

 

Through a combination of TV, films, advertising, and the internet, teenagers these days are exposed to even more images of what a perfect body looks like than past generations. Social media, in particular, has been extremely damaging, providing a constant feed of “aspirational” images that can give teens a skewed view of their own bodies. As a parent, what can you do to help your teenager navigate this world and develop a healthy body image?

 

Focus on Health, Not Weight

In an age where 17.4 percent of American children are obese and 2.4 percent are morbidly obese, many parents are naturally worried about their kids gaining weight. Obesity comes with a variety of health issues, and it is normal for parents to want their children to grow up healthy.

However, there are a few factors to consider. To begin with, the measure which is most commonly used to measure obesity, the BMI, can be unreliable, particularly in children. Make sure you get the opinion of a medical professional before making any drastic changes in their diet. Secondly, being too strict with their diet now could lead to backlash later as your teen starts getting access to junk foods.

Teach them about health from a young age, and avoid words like “fat” and “skinny.” Encourage exercise as a family and promote a balanced diet — which includes the occasional treat — within your household. Place the emphasis on how food and exercise can make them feel, not how it can make them look.

 

Value Their Other Qualities

You think your child is beautiful, and you tell them every day. There is, of course, nothing wrong with this, and your kid will probably understand that their parents don’t have a very objective opinion. However, as your kids grow older, make sure you are praising their skills, interests, and personality.

According to the Guardian, this is particularly important for girls. It turns out that repeatedly telling young girls that they are pretty is a very easy way to teach them that the most important thing about them is their appearance.

 

Be a Good Example

Your children will tend to emulate the behaviors they see in their parents. This means that if they see you talking negatively about your own or other people’s bodies, they are more likely to grow up being critical of their appearance.

It’s not just about body talk. You should set a good example by eating how you wish your child was eating, as kids pick up the food habits they see at home. This also goes for the ways in which you try to lose weight. According to the New York Times, children can develop unhealthy ideas about dieting by seeing their parents follow strict or fad diets. With over half of teenage girls and one-third of boys engaging in unhealthy weight control behaviors, it is definitely worth watching whether you are setting a bad example by looking for shortcuts.

 

Learn To Spot An Eating Disorder

Even if you do everything right, your teenager can still develop an unhealthy body image due to factors out of your control, such as bullying at school. Make sure you know the signs to watch out for so you can get them the help they need. These include obvious things like skipping meals, controlling portions, and obsessing over calories, but there are other more subtle cues. Watch out for them leaving the table early, as this could be a sign of purging, and avoiding social situations that involve food.

Being a teenager is hard for most people. You grow increasingly self-conscious, and the pressure to fit in with your peers is overwhelming. The best thing you can do is teach them to value things about themselves other than their appearance and combine this with a good education about healthy lifestyles. The rest may be out of your hands, but you can keep a close eye on their relationship to food and exercise so you can address any unhealthy behaviors.

 

Author

I am a single dad raising two children. At DadSolo.com, my goal is to provide other single dads with information and resources to help them better equip themselves on the journey that is parenthood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In support of families

Screen Shot 2018-06-22 at 8.15.04 AMThe following letter was submitted to the Columbus Dispatch earlier this week. While policy has been reversed, the message is still relevant and significant.

Dear Editor,

For the past 15 years, I have been the Executive Director of Huckleberry House.  Huckleberry House provides services including shelter and transitional living housing to homeless and runaway youth.  During my time here I have learned this about children in shelters:  no matter how great your shelter is, and Huck House is a great shelter, children want and need their families.

In every other aspect of our country’s policies and values, we affirm that families are the best way to care for children.  We do this because we know that children need the love, guidance and support of committed adults if they are to thrive as adults.  We also know that when a family can’t care for their children, the best second option is a foster family.  Yes, it is true that families aren’t always perfect, but they are the best option for raising children.

We must remain vigilant in upholding a commitment to families.

If we think there will be no lingering affects to these children, we are lying to ourselves. Even a cursory review of research and training for foster and adoption programs reveals that we know a great deal about what happens to children in both the short and long run.  We know that the grief is deep and profound, we know that separation can affect the cognitive and social development of children, and we know that childhood trauma leads to chronic health issues. If you want to read about this for yourself, you can go to the Federal Department of Health and Human Services webpage.

So, please score your political points without harming these children.  Caring for and raising children is a privilege.  We used to know that.

Sincerely,

Becky Westerfelt

Executive Director, Huckleberry House

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How does LGBTQ+ affect homeless youth?

By Leslie Scott, LSW

FINAL PRIDE Blog for 61118

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With a little help from our friends…

Each year, Huck House is invited by See Kids Dream to help teach young students about how they can make the world a better place. Guess what happens. Yep! These young students go out and make the world a better place! This year, the students at Ohio Avenue Elementary School, with help from their advisers from Crimson Cup Coffee, created this awesome video to spread awareness about Huck House.

 

Ohio Avenue Elementary School was featured on the news (click here to watch) for the help they are giving to Huck House. On an equally inspirational, and more serious, note, their school was the topic of an article in The Atlantic last month: “One Ohio School’s Quest to Rethink Bad Behavior.”

Thank you to the See Kids Dream Club at Ohio Avenue Elementary School for making the world a better place.

 

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Sip & Shop (& Shelter)

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Wednesday, June 13, 2018

5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

J. McLaughlin

1631 Lane Avenue, Columbus, OH 43221

 

Come check out J.McLaughlin’s summer styles AND give back to Columbus’ youth while having a drink and a nosh. J.McLaughlin is donating 15% of the evening’s sales to Huck House. These funds will go towards the myriad of services Huck House offers our teens like the Crisis Shelter and the Transitional Living, Family Support and Youth Outreach Programs. Please feel free to bring friends and share this invitation. See you there!

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100 Day Challenge to End Youth Homelessness

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Last summer and fall, Huckleberry House and six other Columbus agencies participated in A Way Home America’s 100-Day Challenge. The 100-Day Challenge is a project designed to stimulate intense collaboration, innovation, and execution, all in pursuit of a wildly ambitious 100-day goal.

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